Good Morning Mission, and welcome to Virus Village, your daily Covid-19 data dump.

If the allegations in Joe’s stories on soft story scandal are true, then we are “in deep shit” says Supervisor Myrna Melgar who has called for hearings. These promise to be the most interesting hearings in recent memory.

London Breed nominated City Attorney Dennis Herrera to take over the PUC. As Joe reports, it’s a big move with many potential ramifications.

Can you believe that after a year of pandemic overload, the Federal government has yet to promulagate Covid emergency workplace standards? Umm Yes. Cynical? Maybe, but of 5 states with the most farmworkers, only 3 have prioritized providing them with vaccinatons.

Another study, this one among US healthcare workers, shows remarkable real-world effictiveness of the MRNA vaccines.

While waiting for The Vaccination, scroll down for today’s Covid numbers.

Note there are some discrepancies from the CDC data used for the chart and the data supplied from SFDPH. As of April 26, DPH reports over 69 percent (532,773) of San Francisco residents over 16 had received one dose, and over 45 percent (346,075) are completely vaccinated.  On April 26, the seven-day rolling average of shots per day was 8,187. The DPH goal is 10,000 shots a day. For information on where to get vaccinated in and around the Mission, visit our Vaccination Page.

Covid-19 R Estimation has moved its estimate of the San Francisco R number back down to .98. It has been fluctuating around 1 for some weeks now. The site’s current estimate for California is .88. All but one of the models in the ensemble place the SF R Number below 1 with an average estimate at .87, while its California R Number average estimate stayed stable at .87.

As of April 22, the Mission has the highest case count in the City with 4089 cases, or 685.6 cases per 10,000 residents. Only 11 (8 in the Southeast) neighborhoods in the City have had more than 1000 cases, while 15 have had 500 or less.

For the week ending April 19, the seven-day rolling average of daily new cases in the City was 32 new cases, or 3.7 new cases per day per 100,000 residents. Since March 4, the weekly average new case count has been below 40 and above 30.

As noted yesterday, the drop in San Francisco Covid cases has been led by the Latinx community. Kudos to the Latino Task Force and UCSF who celebrated the anniversary of their extraordinary pandemic partnership yesterday.

On April 23, ICU patients were back into double figures but overall hospitalizations were down from earlier in the week. For the week ending April 23, the rate of weekly change in Covid positive patients rose 3 percent.   During that week,  the seven-day average availability of ICU beds was 36 percent and Acute Care availability was 25 percent. On April 23, DPH reports Covid patients comprised 4.5 percent of ICU occupancy and .9 percent of Acute Care occupancy.  DPH reports on April 23, the City had 100 percent ICU and 98 percent Acute Care surge capacity

The latest data from the Federal Health and Human Services department shows last week SFGH had 6 Covid patients and 77 percent ICU occupancy, while across the Mission, CPMC had 2 Covid patients and 44 percent ICU occupancy.

The Citywide average weekly positivity rate fell below .9 for the first time this month.

California’s average positivity rate has been falling since mid-February and is now at a record low.

Those San Franciscans between the ages of 21 and 29 have contracted approximately 33 percent of the new cases so far in April. Those between the ages of 30-39 have 25 percent, 20 and younger 15 percent, 40-49 10 percent, 50-59 8 percent, while those 60 and older have 9 percent of April’s new cases.

Mark Rabine

Mark Rabine has lived in the Mission for over 40 years. "What a long strange trip it's been."

Join the Conversation

1 Comment

  1. i have been reading on Covid through your tracker for many months, thank you.

    I just want to know if anyone can tell us what Asian groups account for the most deaths?
    Can you point me towards a source?

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *