On June 17, Brava! For Women in the Arts announced that it was selected as one of 10 recipients of Hewlett 50 Arts Commissions and will receive $150,000 to commission a new work by Vanessa Sanchez called “Ghostly Labor.” The piece will shed light on the stories of Chicana and Native American women working along the U.S.-Mexico borderlands through a fusion of Mexican Zapateado and Afro-Caribbean movement with tap dance. It will include live percussion as well as original Son Jarocho arrangements and video projection. 

“This project brings to light the resilience, beauty and strength of Chicana, Latina and Indigenous laborers and farmworkers, who are the backbone of our society but have been unseen, exploited and ignored for generations,” Sanchez said. 

Sanchez interviewed Latina, Chicana and Indigenous laborers, academics and historians to inform her work. It will feature her dance company, La Mezcla, and debut at Brava’s historic theater in the Mission. 

Virtual Events:

A group of artists will be premiering their song and accompanying video “Our Children Are Sacred”/“Nuestros Niños Son Sagrados,” on Facebook Live at 3 p.m. today, following by a discussion between artists and activists including special guest Dolores Huerta. 

The song, which was written in solidarity with families being held in detention centers as a result of President Trump’s “Zero Tolerance” policy, was written and performed by Diana Gameros, Francisco Herrera and Liliana Herrera. 

Sung in the style of Nueva Trova, the song aims to bring awareness to over 5,400 migrant children suffering from trauma and sometimes death when they were separated from their parents by U.S. immigration officials. 

Instead of the usual crowds of paraders donning rainbow clothing in celebration of the LGBTQ community, this weekend’s Pride, which marks the 50th anniversary of the event, will officially be celebrated virtually. 

This weekend-long celebration hosted by iconic San Francisco drag queens and activists will stream through SFPride.org. The 13-plus hours of programming will include musical performances from artists including Thelma Houston, a tribute to the underground ballroom community with contestants from HBO’s show Legendary and conversations reflecting on the long history of activism and struggles within the LGBTQ+ community, with spotlights on black queer and transgender activism. 

Other Pride week online events are listed in this San Francisco Examiner list

Upcoming:

While the coronavirus pandemic has forced many official in-person Pride celebrations to go virtual, one multiracial collective is creating an in-person protest Pride that will “elevate and center Black queer and transgender communities and their voices and demands,” the group told SF Weekly

Pride is a Riot, the name of the protest the anonymous group has planned, will begin Sunday, June 28 at noon on 19th and Dolores streets, marching at 2 p.m. In an IndyBay posting for the protest, the group said, “We will gather to honor LGBTQ freedom fighters who came before us, to call for the liberation of Black, Brown and Indigenous people, and to demonstrate that trans and queer people are in this fight,” with calls to defund, dismantle and abolish the police. 

Another San Francisco group has revolution on their minds: the San Francisco Mime Troupe, who is asking “Can the revolution be socially distanced?” with a new nine-part podcast series called “Tales of the Resistance.” 

The stories will replace their sixty-first season of political musical theater in Bay Area parks, SFMT members will be writing and performing original political comedy episodes that will be broadcast by bi-weekly. Each episode will be presented in one of four different styles: noir, sci fi, horror and adventure. The first episode will premiere on July 4 and can be listened to here. All shows are free to listen to, but donations can be made here

Check out all of our event listings here.