File photo: Local artist Arianna Davalos recorded the Mission’s gripes and moans for six hours straight in 2014. Check out the results over the weekend on twitter (twitter.com/sfcomplaintdept).

I love to complain. Apparently, I’m in good company – at least judging by this map of 311 complaints by RentCafe, which indicates calls about sidewalk cleaning and graffiti removal increased 24 percent 2014-2015. Who complained the most? The Inner Mission, with more than 30,000 calls registered.

The intersection of 18th and Mission streets, for some reason, attracted overall the most complaints of any intersection citywide, though SocketSite didn’t elaborate on what those calls were for.

Don’t get me wrong – I’m convinced complaining is as effective a way of getting stuff done as any. As we saw when, the day after SFist outed a Rec and Park policy that allowed people to make paid reservations of park grass, enormous public outcry ensued. The next day, the department announced (with some help from Supervisor Scott Wiener) that it would end the program.

Another gripe: You have to make $144,000 a year to buy a median home in San Francisco, Curbed reports, which is more than many high-ranking people in “elite” positions like software engineer and biochem researchers make. Silver lining? The salary required to buy a median home in the area has actually fallen 2.5 percent since last year.

But, one thing to hold your ire on: Arizmendi is not being demolished, despite a notice of demolition taped to their door that caused some alarm this week. The notice was sent out, under city law, to any establishment or resident within 300 feet of the actual demolition site, which is the gas station at 24th and Valencia where plans have been filed to construct a six-story, 35-unit mixed use building.

Keep an eye out next week for what goes down at this Government Audit and Oversight Committee meeting on Thursday morning, because the three supervisors on the committee will be discussing some potentially very restrictive short term rental legislation that would put the onus on Airbnb and other platforms to check whether a unit is registered with the city or not.

And here’s a fun tidbit: In a dramatic video by Kostas Petrakos Films, you can see the process of mounting a 470-pound cross on the top of the dome of the new Greek Orthodox Church on Valencia Street – by helicopter. Yes, really.

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  1. I wanted to check my assumption that the article skated the difference between phone calls to SF311 and reports through the mobile apps. I pulled the data from
    https://data.sfgov.org/City-Infrastructure/Case-Data-from-San-Francisco-311-SF311-/vw6y-z8j6
    Data tabulation confirms that for 2015 Mission people are much more likely (21 K compared to 9.2 K.) to submit reports to SF311 though the app, compared to voice-in telephone calls

    The data also shows that Missionites use the mobile app more than other neighborhoods. For contrast, the Sunset and Richmond districts combined logged 13.2 K voice-in calls and only 7.9 K reports submitted through the app.

    So by more than 2 to 1, Mission district people contact SF311 by mobile app reports, while Sunset and Richmond district people contact SF311 nearly by nearly the opposite ratio of twice as many voice in calls.

    And as a, by the way, accounting attribute call center costs of $4.50 to $6.50 per voice call.

  2. Is the Mission District really made up of are a bunch of complainers? This article skates over the difference between calls to 311 and reports using the android and iphone version of the Connectedbits and seeclickfix apps. ”

    The mobile apps are changing the relationship between citizen and city. As quoted in the The Responsive City: Engaging Communities Through Data-Smart Governance By Stephen Goldsmith, Susan Crawford, “What’s really interesting is that people have said when they call in, they feel like they’re complaining. When they use mobile, they feel like they’re helping.”