Dolores Park filled with color and charisma on Friday afternoon for the annual Trans March as thousands of people gathered with signs, flags, and, in some cases, heels, to celebrate trans life and show the power of visibility –  the theme of this year’s march.

People from across the country gathered to ring in the 11th annual of Trans March, which started in 2004 by an anonymous email that called for a march to “to demonstrate that we are a significant and growing portionof the LGBTQ community . Since then it grown into a staple – and kick off –  of Pride weekend. Last year, it drew a crowd of about 2,000 people, according to SFGate.

Photo by Emma Neiman

Photo by Emma Neiman

“Trans March is the biggest [event] that I look forward to for the year,” said Alex Bergeron, a 20-year-old trans man who just won the Colin Higgins Youth Courage Award, which honors youth who have shown courage in the face of intolerance based on their sexual orientation or gender identity.

“It means visibility,” said a march-goer named Nori. “It means you see you’re not the only trans person, and that we all look very different,” she said.

The day of Trans March includes a youth and elder brunch, a celebration in the park, and a Resource Fair with organizations that aim to help queer and trans people such as Health Right 360, Trans Lifeline, and Our Family Coalition.

David Spain and Giovanni Esparza. Photo by Emma Neiman

David Spain and Giovanni Esparza. Photo by Emma Neiman

Trans March this year comes on an especially historic day for the queer community, as the Supreme Court ruled in same-sex marriage constitutional this morning. While many expressed happiness about the ruling, many said they wanted to keep the day focused on the trans community and the issues it faces.

“Marriage equality is one piece of the puzzle,” said Amy Lessler, who works for Health Right 360 “I hope we can be here and celebrate, but also reflect on all the other work that needs to be done.”

Greta Martela, a trans woman who is married to another woman and lives in Chicago, said that the right to same-sex marriage has been important to her life. Nevertheless she said, there are more pressing issues to deal with, like suicide prevention and prison rights for trans people.

Danielle Castro, who works with Taja’s Coalition, echoed that sentiment. “I’m always happy when there are accomplishments,” she said, “but trans people are still being killed.”

“I think that that is great that we helped fight for gays to have equality, and now it’s time they fight for us to have the same liberties in this country,” said Sadaisha Shimmers, a trans woman and activist.

Eddy. Photos by Emma Neiman

Eddy. Photos by Emma Neiman

Marcia Martinez. Photo by Emma Neiman

Marcia Martinez. Photo by Emma Neiman

"We're still here." Photo by Emma Neiman

“We’re still here.” Photo by Emma Neiman

Photo by Emma Neiman

Photo by Emma Neiman

Photo by Emma Neiman

Photo by Emma Neiman

Garza of the House of Garza performing. Photo by Emma Neiman

Garza of the House of Garza performing. Photo by Emma Neiman

Photo by Emma Neiman

Photo by Emma Neiman

Photo by Emma Neiman

Photo by Emma Neiman

Photo by Emma Neiman

Photo by Emma Neiman

Diana Morningstar's first time at Trans March. Photo by Emma Neiman

Diana Morningstar’s first time at Trans March. Photo by Emma Neiman

Photo by Emma Neiman

Photo by Emma Neiman

Photo by Emma Neiman

Photo by Emma Neiman

Photo by Emma Neiman

Photo by Emma Neiman

Skylar, who is beginning her transition, and whose motto is, "All butterflies fly free past forever." Photo by Emma Neiman

Skylar, who is beginning her transition, and whose motto is, “All butterflies fly free past forever.” Photo by Emma Neiman

Photo by Emma Neiman

Photo by Emma Neiman

Jade and Anna Photo by Emma Neiman

Jade and Anna. Photo by Emma Neiman

Photo by Emma Neiman

Photo by Emma Neiman