Shooting on 24th and Shotwell Leaves One Man Wounded

Photo by @KEEPEYESSF via twitter.

Photo by @KEEPEYESSF via twitter.

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A man in his 20s who sustained gunshot wounds during an argument on the corner of 24th and Shotwell streets was taken to the hospital with unknown injuries, according to three witnesses on the scene who asked that their names not be used for fear of retribution.

The incident occurred sometime after 5:30 p.m. and started after a group of men in their 20s had an argument with two other men who were standing across the street,  witnesses said.

The two men shot five times at the group and hit the victim in his 20s twice, according to the witnesses.

Police collected shell casings in front of the Western Union at 993 Shotwell St, according to a police scanner twitter service.

The group of men who were with the victim as well as the suspects fled the scene. The victim, only described as a man in his 20s wearing a white shirt, ran southbound on Shotwell street before collapsing halfway down the block.

He was still conscious and moaning when he was carried away by the ambulance, a witness said.

We will update this story as we get more information.

39 Comments

  1. ThatGuy

    KEEP THE MISSION BROWN!

  2. pete

    Protests against cops. Protests against buses. Protests against buildings. Will there be a protest against violence?

    • ACamarena

      There was a protest against violence today. The 2nd Annual Archidiocese march from
      St. Anthony’s to Mission Dolores with speakers (victims of violence) at 16th & 24th BART plazas. More can be done, of course… Takes a village, or as the United Playaz say, Takes the hood to save the hood.

    • City

      What about protesting the scum bag gangbanging thugs who create this violence? No just protest the cops who are here to protect us…idiots

    • care for people

      Do you live under a rock. There have been plenty peace marches on
      24

  3. poor.ass.millionaire

    That’s a fucked up corner. I always see ghetto punks with white shirts hanging around. Police should crack down hard there, disperse these twats. Zero tolerance. But instead we have half the police force escorting some dumb white idiots protesting gentrification. Must have been 30 cops when that diatribe went on. waste.of.time.effort.

  4. Ragingnica

    Poor ass…. Too bad a stray didn’t cap your ass

  5. HRod

    I’m a Mission native born and bred, and it’s always had it’s fair share of violence as long as I can remember. I wish there wasn’t any, but there is.
    I hope one day it does get better but not at the expense of changing the dynamic of the neighborhood. In other words making the Mission “white” does not solve the problem for anyone, except white people.
    That’s not being racist, that’s being real.
    As I see it, all these white 20 something transplants moving in, are only using the Mission because it’s the “Place to be” a fad that they will abandon and the folks that hung on and survived will have a new problem on their hands.

    • John

      So having more white people is too high a price to pay for getting rid of violence?

    • poor.ass.millionaire

      Sorry bro, but the mission has always been culturally diverse including whites,asians and blacks. It has been gentrifying for 20 years, which has helped reduce violence. But that gentrification has benefited everyone here, and it is also due to everyone, not just whites, etc.

      • landline

        Can you explain how gentrification has helped former residents who were involuntarily displaced?

        • John

          Each trend has to be assessed in utilitarian terms i.e. the greatest benefit to the greatest number.

          Clearly a small number of people may have relocated as a result of the neighborhood becoming more affluent. But then again they probably would have left long ago had they not lucked into a rent-controlled unit. That isn’t a sustainable subsistence.

          But we have lower crime, better maintained homes, great stores, bars and restaurants and a confident, vital spirit pervading the neighborhood. The fact that a few people had to move somewhere more suited to their wallet doesn’t invalidate the benefits to the majority of us.

          • landline

            First, I addressed the question to p.a.m, not to you. Where are your manners?

            Second, he wrote that gentrification benefits everyone, which is ridiculous on its face, despite your mumbo jumbo, classist rhetorical apologia.

          • landline

            So on the basis of utilitarianism, you would support progressive taxation, or better yet, the Robin Hood solution, take from the (few) rich to give to the (many) poor? That provides the “greatest benefit to the greatest number.”

          • John

            To your first, all comments here are public, so a question to one poster may be answered by any other poster here. That way you can potentially learn more.

            Utilitarianism as formulated by John Stuart Mill was one of the major influences on the US Constitution and in particular, while majorities do have a higher moral imperative, we have enshrined protection for minorities as well.

            Whether that minority is poor blacks or rich whites does not affect the principle. so while we already have so-called progressive taxation, it is not punitive or confiscatory on our winners.

            Robin Hood is a cute story but if you tried that now, you’d be convicted of multiple felonies.

          • soydelamission

            you are an asshat… Small number of people being relocated??? Go fuck yourself you imbecile. Hundreds of families that have been in The Mission probably since before you were born have lost their homes. The latino community has been displaced. But then all you probably know about the latino culture is how to order a soy burrito wrapped in an organic gluten , flour less tortilla sittino on a bed of sustainably rises organic arugula…

        • poor.ass.millionaire

          I said it helps all current residents. There are way more existing mission residents (that are working class, low rent, minority, etc.) then those who left. And they all benefit from safer and cleaner streets. Gentrification is a net + for almost everyone. The few who were displaced….welcome to life as a renter (not owner), sorry it didn’t work out, that’s life in the big city, embrace change, etc., etc.

          • landline

            Gentrification will displace some current residents. In fact, some are facing no fault evictions and landlord harassment as I write this comment.

          • John

            Are you suggesting that gentrification is wrong if even just a single person gets a no-fault eviction? And even if life becomes better for tens of thousands?

            And doesn’t the lost home of one person become the housing opportunity for another? Thereby creating dynamism and mobility where there might otherwise be sclerosis and stagnation?

          • landline

            Yes to the first question. You base the rest of your questions on classist prejudices and unprovable assumptions.

          • John

            If you hold the situation of one person to be more important than the situation of tens of thousands of people, then readers can easily decide whether that is reasonable or extreme.

        • poor.ass.millionaire

          For the record, I don’t mind if John chimes in. I know his writing comes off a bit as a character from Atlas Shrugged, but you guys should really be more tolerant of diverse POV’s. He’s basically a conservative democrat; what’s the big deal? It’s not like he’s a republican tea party loon. Just how far left has this city veered? I think SF can handle a few conservative democrats. Let’s be open minded!

    • City

      I am a native San Franciscan Mission resident myself but its not a question of White Vs. Brown. The reality is the gentrification is a part of life and it has been in every major city across the United States. So i should ask you this… would it be such a problem if it was Asians moving in or African Americans? Why does ethnicity matter? Neighborhoods change for good & bad & the Mission is fortunate that its a going thru a positive change. Whats wrong with that? Simply put would you rather be surrounded by thugs, criminals, and the bad elemant or whites in their 20s?

  6. Tom T

    Darn techie scum. This is what happens when programmers disagree over coding approaches.

  7. code3

    all those 20 something techies treat the neighborhood like a frat house, they get loaded on the weekends, they vomit and urinate in front of people’s houses, scream and yell after they leave bars at 2 am, they wake up people that already asleep , their lack of respect for other people and sense of entitlement , sucks.

  8. code3

    i have no problem with the Police being at the 16th street plaza.

    why post cops at the plaza for the last 6 months and not do it for the last 20 years?

    i wellcome the Police present, people have been robbed , assaulted and killed around that area for years.

    why the new police presence?

    could it be that some rich developer wants to clean before they build those 2 luxury apartment buildings where Wallgreens and Burger King stores are?

    If i was the mayor , i would had made the cops years ago walk the neighborhood everyday to have a more visible presence, not just stand at the plaza.

Comments are closed.