Sen. Scott Wiener stands head and shoulders above most everyone he meets — including, today, his primary challenger. Photo by Hiya Swanhuyser

As new election results were reported Wednesday, around 35,500 more votes were counted, leaving around 112,000 or so to count following Tuesday’s election.

That 112,000 figure is a sharp uptick from earlier estimates, but ballots keep arriving at City Hall — lending credence to predictions that many California Democrats of all political leanings held onto their ballots until the last moments, due to instability in the presidential race.

On to the day’s results: In the contest for state senator, incumbent Scott Wiener’s lead increased a little; he’s now at just over 56 percent, with challenger Jackie Fielder dropping from 32.5 percent to 31.5 percent — but still showing a stronger-than-expected performance.

Fielder’s campaign director, Roisin Isner, remained confident Wednesday. “Either way, we’re going on to November, and we pretty dramatically overperformed. I’ve talked to every consultant I know, and they all say, ‘Yeah, that’s dramatic.’ It confirms the theory of the race I have, which is that he is vulnerable, and he’s become divisive.”

The Democratic County Central Committee race remained mostly where it had been Tuesday night, with the progressive slates dominating both the 17th and 19th Assembly District races.

Proposition E, which would tie office development to affordable housing creation, retains a healthy lead with some 54 percent of the vote.

Proposition A, a massive City College bond, appears headed for victory, as does Prop. B, an earthquake bond, and Prop. C, which would provide healthcare to former Housing Authority workers. Prop. D, which would tax landlords who leave storefronts vacant, is holding at 68 percent of the vote, slightly over the two-thirds threshold.

In judge races, Maria Evangelista and Michelle Tong, both public defenders, seem cleared for victory. Carolyn Gold and Rani Singh are engaged in the tightest race of the election. The former has 50.03 percent of the vote and a lead of some 600 votes.

The next update comes on Thursday at round 4 p.m.

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6 Comments

  1. “In the race for state senator, incumbent Scott Wiener’s lead increased a little; he’s now at just over 56 percent, with challenger Jackie Fielder dropping from 32.5 percent to 31.5 percent — but still showing a stronger than expected performance.”

    Not surprising — trendy “Democratic Socialist” Jackie Fielder is the “useful idiot” for anti-housing, faux-progressive NIMBY homeowners (gotta protect that investment at all costs!) and economically-ignorant ideologues.

    1. Dude,

      Please answer me one thing honestly.

      Why are all of your comments peppered with
      things to hurt the feeling of your opponents?

      Can’t you just stick to the facts?

      Do you get some kind of pleasure from striking out?

      Go Giants!

      h.

  2. Explain why the same candidates run in both the primary & general election. Will Erin Smith be on the November ballot also? Seems redundant.

    1. Jon — 

      Thanks for writing. I can do this.

      In California we have an “open primary.” This means the top-two finishers in the primary go on to run against one another in the general election. Since this is a heavily Democratic city in a heavily Democratic state, this often means the top-two finishers are Democrats.

      So, this year, we’ll have Nancy Pelosi facing Shahid Buttar and Scott Wiener facing Jackie Fielder. In the past David Campos ran against David Chiu, Scott Wiener ran against Jane Kim, and so on. In heavily GOP states the same dynamic applies.

      Erin Smith will not be running in the general. But it has been pointed out to me that Erin was the No. 1 vote-getter for the Republican County Central Committee. The fund-raising and publicity of a state senate run certainly didn’t hurt!

      Best,

      JE

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