Vandalism in Numbers, Quotes and Sketches

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Time: Police were called around 9:15 p.m.

 

 

Protesters: A group of approximately 60 protesters dressed in black clothes, some wearing ski masks, marched down 18th Street and Valencia Street, vandalizing cars and businesses.

The people were in black, they were hooded,” said J.H. Kolsteni, Farina’s chief operating officer. “It was like they were terrorists. If it was Halloween I would have called them ninjas.”

 

Arrests: 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Number of calls police received: 500

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Property damaged: Cars, storefronts, the Mission Police Station, tables, chairs, vases.
“I had a very expensive sports coat on and it got paint on it,” Kolsteni said.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Businesses affected:

Brick and Mortar
Taca Airlines
299 Valencia
Tradesmen
Property Management Systems
The Voyager Shop
Four Barrel
Pica Pica Maize Kitchen
Art Zone 461 Gallery
Locanda
Bar Tartine
Therapy
Weston Wear
Mission Police Station
Farina
Tartine

Paint bombs: “Ironically, the paint protesters used was water-soluble,” said Vinny Eng, Bar Tartine’s general manager. “Our wonderfully generous neighbor Locanda helped us wash off the paint last night.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What it sounded like: “We heard all the glass breaking and it sounded like gunshots were hitting windows,” Therapy General Manager Cat Mayfield said. “They were shooting paintballs at our window, a car was completely smashed with crowbars.”

“It was almost like a tornado went through on our side of the street and destroyed everything in its path,” Mayfield said.

 

 

 

 

 

Cost:
- Weston Wear: $7,000, not including loss of business due to closure, according to Bridget Moore, general manager.

- Bar Tartine: $800 to replace a window, not including such costs as anti-graffiti material to be added.

- Farina: No estimate yet.

- Brick and Mortar: Six broken windows will cost approximately $12,000.

 

 

 

 

 

What Mission Loc@l readers think:
“I am ashamed to live in a City and neighborhood with people who behave violently and selfishly. San Francisco and the Mission have so many creative and caring people. We are all degraded by people whose only response to change they don’t like is to harm others and destroy their property. Let us find ways to make positive change.” — Robert Cornwell

“The funny thing is that many people who come to the Mission from outside of it and patronize restaurants like Locanda are drawn to the neighborhood by this sort of ‘danger’ and ‘excitement.’
If the goal of the protest was to target rich people and scare them out of the Mission, then I think it may achieve just the opposite.” — Old Mission Neighbor

“Right, because small business is responsible for the bank profiteering schemes… *eye roll*” — Noni Azure

“I don’t believe they were ‘May protesters,’ they were impostors…” — Sissi Rivera

 

8 Comments

  1. You can add Embarkadero Social Club to your list of affected businesses. I guess we were the last blast before the “ops” scurried away from the riot police.

  2. NABNYC

    Historically, when the state wanted to discredit and cause disunity in a progressive organization (trade union, labor movements, anti-war), they always plant police officers into the middle of the movement, and instruct them to use their best efforts to incite violence. Then what happens is that the police come back later, arrest large numbers of those who participated in a peaceful protest, arrest the leaders of the movement, and charge them all with absurd crimes such as conspiracy to commit terrorism, seeking extreme punishment such as 20 years in prison. It’s an old trick, but they keep doing it. The best that Occupy people can do is to take pictures of anybody who is advocating violence, or committing vandalism, and/or stand up and denounce them in group meetings.

    • Cliff

      No, the best the Occupy people can do is get out and VOTE!!! Get educated about the world around you. Millions of Americans have fought and died to defend democracy and yet a group of people with legitimate problems now see democracy as the problem.

      Political action by way of violence and intimidation is not protest. Stop calling them protestors. This was a mob.

    • marco

      Conspiracy theorist. If you saw these punks you’d know they weren’t cops. Plus, if the strategy was what you described, why no arrests? No way in hell this was AP’s

  3. Rod

    I sing with SF Gay Men’s Chorus. We were having rehearsal that evening and quite a few Chorus members cars were vandalized. No total cost yet, but we are tallying

  4. Matt

    I am a Mission resident and when I see people’s reactions, all I can think of is where is the uproar about the constant MURDERS in the Mission? None of the store owners from Valencia came to Mission and 17th last month for the memorial of a person shot there. And that’s real violence. It seems like there is a lot of disconnection in this community and I hope the discussion about that stays at the forefront. There are a lot of disgruntled people and it’s finally time for a dialog.

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