UCSF’s Department of Medicine Grand Rounds on February 11, 2021 included (from top left): Bob Wachter, Monica Gandhi, Marguerita Lightfoot, Robert Rodriguez and Eric Goosby. Illustration by Molly Oleson; photos from screenshots of live event.

Hello Readers:

Once again we have Grand Rounds for you – and some good news on vaccines.

In other news:

  • The Covid Tracker
  • People We Meet – A sidewalk artist and someone who still makes eyeglasses.

Stay safe,

— Lydia


Stories

UCSF Grand Rounds: Vaccine trial data, addressing hesitancy, and insight into the Biden administration’s Covid-19 response

it did not take long for Dr. Monica Gandhi, Dr. Bob Wachter’s first guest, to dispel fears of the variants.

People We Meet: Felix Shrayber

Every day, Felix Shrayber goes to his business on 21st and Capp streets, Payless Optical, and sits behind the counter waiting for customers looking to buy new glasses or get their current pair repaired. 

Covid Tracker: 32,695 cases, 351 deaths

As of February 10, over 13 percent (101,710) of San Francisco residents over 18 have received one dose, while 4 percent (27,431) have received two. On February 10, a record 5370 shots were delivered, and the seven day rolling average of shots per day rose to 5210. The DPH goal is 10,000 shots per day.  

People We Meet: An artist uses chalk to give the gift of art to his community

Nick Larson uses chalk to give the gift of art to his community. On Tuesday, he was using chalk to fill in an elaborate drawing of a woman on the sidewalk at 25th Street.

That tickles

Just a snap from Sharon Street.

Recipe for an excellent news site?

Reporters who do the work, readers who support the work.

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I’ve been a Mission resident since 1998 and a professor emeritus at Berkeley’s J-school since 2019 when I retired. I got my start in newspapers at the Albuquerque Tribune in the city where I was born and raised. Like many local news outlets, The Tribune no longer exists. I left daily newspapers after working at The New York Times for the business, foreign and city desks. Lucky for all of us, it is still there.

As an old friend once pointed out, local has long been in my bones. My Master’s Project at Columbia, later published in New York Magazine, was on New York City’s experiment in community boards.

Right now I'm trying to figure out how you make that long-held interest in local news sustainable. The answer continues to elude me.