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Three people at the Umpqua Bank at 3938 24th Street in Noe Valley watched as two suspects walked in at 2:30 p.m. Monday and robbed the bank, according to witnesses.

One 20-year-old suspect pulled a gun on a 47-year-old teller and demanded the money. The second suspect, in his 40s, opened the door and walked behind the counter to take the cash from the open drawers.

Photo of Escalade from 2007.
Michi 1308

Both suspects fled on foot and it is possible that they used a black Escalade as a getaway car, according to the police report.

“Everyone is fine, a bit shaken, but everything is fine,” said one of the employees today. The bank, which has two branches in the city, has been on 24th Street since 2010 and it is the second time it has been robbed, according to employees.

The employees declined to say how much money was taken. The bank robbers were not hooded or masked, employees said.

Two hours later at Scott and Fulton, two men approached a 39-year-old woman, pulled her purse from her shoulder and then fled in a black Escalade where a driver was waiting, according to the police report.

As in the earlier bank robbery, one of the suspects was described as being around 20-years old. The witness did not give any ages for the other two suspects.

If you have any information about any of the incidents described above, you can leave an anonymous tip at Mission Station by calling 415-552-4558.

Crime is trauma and the county offers different services. Here is a link to a page of services.

Victims of violent crime can also contact the Trauma Recover Center at UCSF.

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Andrea was born and raised in Mexico City, where she graduated as a translator/interpreter. She has been working with Mission Local since 2009 translating content for the Spanish page. Also lives in the Mission, does some reporting, social media and enjoys taking photos and training people that want to contribute to Mission Local.

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  1. ML: So, the suspects weren’t wearing masks, in broad daylight and all we have is “one of the suspects was described as being around 20-years old.” How about skin, hair, build. Anything! Wait, is this a race thing?

    1. Billy: The problem with adding race is that it doesn’t help. If I describe someone as white with a hoodie, it could be a lot of people. Same with Latino with a hoodie or black or Asian. Neither the police or the employees offered much of anything specific. If we had a fuller description and something that could more closely identify a suspect, then we would use it, but that is rare.