No Physical Evidence Ties Detained Suspect to Saturday’s Shooting

Police Officer Adam Shaw who was shot on Saturday afternoon.

Police Officer Adam Shaw who was shot on Saturday afternoon.

En Español.

Police said today they “have no conclusive evidence” as to who shot Officer Adam Shaw on Saturday afternoon because the bullet that went through his left arm has not been found.

Jeffrey Ruano, a 50-year-old San Francisco resident, who was arrested Sunday morning in connection with the shooting, was found with a 38-caliber cartridge in his pocket and charged with possession of ammunition.

At this point, there is no physical evidence tying Ruano to the Saturday shooting. No firearm was found on the suspect at the time he was arrested.

Asked if Shaw’s partner could have fired on Shaw by accident, Officer Albie Esparza said investigators have no evidence of that because they have no bullet. “It was a through and through,” Esparza said, referring to the shot that hit Shaw in the left arm and continued on.

San Francisco police officers are issued 40-caliber cartridges for their department-issued firearms.

“The bullet that struck Officer Shaw has not been recovered,” the press release stated. “Without recovering that bullet, it will be difficult to determine which firearm discharged that specific bullet. At this point in our investigation, we can only confirm that officer Shaw’s partner discharged his firearm.”

“At this point in the investigation, we can’t say conclusively who shot Officer Shaw,” the press release issued today stated. “This is still an ongoing and active investigation.”

Meanwhile Officer Shaw is recovering and in good spirits at San Francisco General Hospital and investigators will be interviewing him sometime today, according to police.

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7 Comments

  1. Upset and hope justice

    Well, even so, is it not true the suspect shot AT the officer? So there is no bullet for evidence, but the fact is that individual shot at a police officer, that alone, they should be convicted, no one should be opening fire on no one, including law enforcement. In the area that crime occurred is already a high crime area and it is not fair at all that people are not held accountable for things they commit, we have individuals doing big time for little things just because of the area they reside. At the end of the day the officer is a person with a family or loved ones just like us. He was doing his job but he is still a person.

  2. kranky

    In the second paragraph, you say that Ruano was arrested “in connection with the murder” but with no death, there is no murder. Maybe you meant “attempted murder”?

  3. landline

    First BART. Now maybe SFPD. Cop shoot cop.

  4. nutrisystem

    I’m guessing that this is going to go down as a huge embarrassment for the SFPD.

    Notice that the SFPD has backed away from claiming that the suspect fired on them at all. Only a bystander is the source of the claim that shots came from the suspect’s car.

    The response was comically overdone – reinforcing the belief that the police care a whole lot more about each other than ordinary citizens. I visited the scene shortly after the event, and there were dozens of officers standing around getting paid to do nothing.

    If only the police were out there, eyes and ears open, deterring crime rather than showing up and standing there after something happens, we’d be in good shape.

    The news helicopters annoyed residents for 90 minutes – loudly hovering to get “Live” video of cops standing around. This practice should be outlawed.

    A final note – police carrying military-grade weapons like .40 caliber large magazine handguns seems inappropriate to me. These rounds are designed to rip apart flesh, which is especially bad when a friendly gets hit.

    • nutrisystem

      And I’m glad they got Ruano. He should get the chair just for the high speed chase which could have EASILY killed bystanders.

    • John

      nutrisystem, the point of having a gun is to stop the other guy. You don’t want to have to fire multiple shots to stop a guy running towards you intent on doing you harm.

      A small caliber slug requires accuracy. You need to hit the heart or head to stop someone and that requires luck. In practice that means multiple shots in the hope that one is the “money shot”, which increases risk to bystanders.

      The stopping power of a bullet is essentially a product of mass, caliber and velocity. A large caliber slug can immobilize a guy no matter where you hit him, as it causes compression waves and an immediate drop in blood pressure. A fortiori, hollow points.

      So more powerful guns actually reduce the risk of collateral damage. Contrast that with the 9mm weapons beloved by gangs. Their high speed trajectories can pass through several walls and travel for hundreds of feet, greatly increasing the risk of killing someone in their own home.

      • nutrisystem

        Police were well served by .38 revolvers (with normal slugs) for a century.

        These Hollywood-style fantasies of police shootouts with well armed gangs are just that – fantasies.

        And, in the unlikely event that things DO get bad, police have shotguns in the car and lots of backup seconds away.

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