Good Morning Mission!

A happy Saturday to you all! If you’re up right now, 7 a.m., then you’re feeling the 46° nip in the air but worry not! It’s expected to be sunny and 66° later today. Want to count your weather chickens before they’ve hatched? You can see the rest of the week here.

Er, it seems our beautiful city has fallen back into Victorian times with a rising number of tuberculosis cases – an issue San Francisco had thought it had squelched in the beginning of the 1900s. Read more about the history of TB and it’s rising urban numbers here in the San Francisco Chronicle.

There is a new San Francisco cookbook in town! This one claims it will tell “the story of San Francisco” through chefs and their recipes. In an interview for the Bay Area News Group, the book’s author said Mission Chinese opted out of sharing recipes. Womp womp. But if you want to check out “San Francisco Chef’s Table” there is an event at Omnivore Books on January 13th.

It appears 2013 was not a good year for historic sites in San Francisco. On a list of 10 relevant old places lost to the United States last year – two of them were ours. They are the Chinese Hospital on Jackson Street and the Pagoda Palace Theatre in North Beach. Sadly the list of saved buildings doesn’t have any from our foggy city. Check out both lists in the San Jose Mercury News.

Today’s Possibilities

3:00 p.m. Author Laura Lam at Borderland Books.

4:00 p.m. Saturday Doggie Happy Hour at Doc’s Clock.

7:00 p.m. Allison Lovejoy’s New Nocturnes Fundraiser at Amnesia.

9:30 p.m. San Francisco Tape Music Festival at Z Below.

 

Filed under: Mobile, Today's Mission

2 Comments

  1. Jeremy

    “Our foggy city” – The buildings that were lost and mentioned in the same paragraph are not in areas that really ever have fog. Nor does the Mission ever have fog. I realize parts of San Francisco are often foggy, but half of it hardly ever is. This is a very trivial example, but it’s amazing to me how easily people adopt, perpetuate, and agree upon simple narratives with which to lable their experience. It applies to more important things like the “gentrification” debate as well, with tragicomic results.

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